Practice Test 1

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Final Countdown Practice Tests. PRACTICE TEST 1. Cloze - Passage 1 .... that all of American literature comes from one great book,. Twain's Adventures of ...

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 1 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about global warming.

For many years, global warming was portrayed in the media as an issue with two sides. Some scientists argued that global warming was occurring, and others argued that it was (91) . However, this portrayal was an oversimplification of the debate. Skeptics of global warming, (92) some scientists, (93) to lingering scientific uncertainties that caused them to question whether global warming was actually occurring. However, there is now (94) evidence that (95) global temperatures are increasing, based direct temperature measurements and observations of other impacts such as (96) glaciers and polar ice, rising sea levels, and changes in the life (97) of plants and animals. As the scientific evidence on rising global temperatures became indisputable, skeptics began to focus on whether human activities are in fact the (98) of global warming. They argued that the observed warming could be brought on by natural processes such as changes in the energy (99)

91.

a. false b. mistake

c. not d. so

92.

a. containing b. including

c. comprising d. composing

93.

a. pointed b. showed

c. leading d. indicated

94.

a. unacceptable b. invalid

c. inconceivable d. undeniable

95.

a. by b. in

c. from d. on

96.

a. fading b. melting

c. sinking d. expanding

97.

a. cycles b. style

c. histories d. expectancy

98.

a. reason b. fault

c. cause d. result

99.

a. emerging b. emitted

c. radiating d. production

a. slightly b. vaguely

c. vastly d. significantly

100.

by the sun. However, the sun’s influence has been found to have contributed only (100) to observed warming, particularly since the mid-20th century. In fact, there is now overwhelming evidence that greenhouse gas emissions from human activities are the main cause of the warming. STEP 1: Skim the passag e for gis

t. STEP 2: Think about wh at is missing and what is tested. STEP 3: Work through the passage, item by item, choice by choice. STEP 4: Reread the pas sage with your answers in place.

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PRACTICE TEST 1 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 1 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about acupuncture.

A key component of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture is most commonly used, both in the East and the West, as a means of alleviating pain. Some people are (101) by the thought of acupuncture and may feel (102) takes a great deal of courage to (103) treatment on themselves. The first and probably most important fact to understand about acupuncture is that it is not a frightening experience. It (104) , however, involve the (105) of fine needles through the skin; most acupuncturists use (106) six and twelve acupuncture needles at each session. The needles (107) are smaller than injection needles; in (108) , an acupuncture needle can fit into the central hole of a normal injection needle. Acupuncture needles do not (109) a cutting end like most hypodermic needles, which means they are far less (110) to cause tissue damage or bruising when inserted.

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101.

a. afraid b. fearful

c. frightened d. horrifying

102.

a. like b. that

c. one d. it

103.

a. afflict b. inflict

c. conflict d. inject

104.

a. may b. always

c. does d. is

105.

a. insertion b. installation

c. interjection d. intervention

106.

a. among b. about

c. approximately d. between

107.

a. that b. used

c. they d. points

108.

a. all b. spite

c. fact d. case

109.

a. have b. make

c. inject d. involve

110.

a. going b. likely

c. due d. painful

PRACTICE TEST 1 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 2 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about hibernation.

Hibernation seems simple enough. Animals fatten up in the summer, disappear into their dens during the winter, (91) food is scarce, and then emerge in the spring alive and alert, if a lot (92) . But if you could peek inside a hibernating ground squirrel, you’d witness a physiological wonder. The animal’s metabolism slows to (93) nothing. Its body temperature plummets to a few (94) warmer than outside. Its heartbeat slows from 300 beats per minute to (95) than 10. And other, more mysterious changes protect the squirrel in a state that would kill many other animals. It’s that self-protection that (96) medical researchers. (97) out how mammals survive such extreme conditions offers clues to how humans might be protected against their own health threats such as stroke, which causes restricted blood flow in the brain, and trauma-induced hemorrhaging. Fueling interest in the field (98) a recent paper showing that mice, which don’t hibernate, (99) induced to do so by a carefully measured-out whiff of a normally toxic gas. When the gas was removed, the mice emerged apparently unharmed from their sluggish state. (100) human applications are years away, hopeful investors have already put up more than $10 million in a start-up company.

91.

a. and b. when

c. so d. although

92.

a. warmer b. survive

c. have d. thinner

93.

a. hardly b. near

c. almost d. next

94.

a. degrees b. levels

c. points d. grades

95.

a. lesser b. fewer

c. under d. smaller

96.

a. disturbs b. observes

c. intrigues d. repels

97.

a. Ruling b. Understanding

c. Checking d. Figuring

98.

a. that b. is

c. because d. when

99.

a. they b. which

c. were d. have

100.

a. While b. If

c. Because d. Since

Take time to notice the flow of each paragraph. Does it contain a topic sentence followed by rea sons or examples? Does it describ e a sequen enccee or present contrasting ide as? Being g sensitive to this will hel p you answer questions relate d to linking words and discourse ma rkers.

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PRACTICE TEST 2 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 2 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about Mark Twain, the American writer.

Samuel Clemens, better known by his pen name of Mark Twain, grew up in the Mississippi River frontier town of Hannibal, Missouri. Ernest Hemingway's famous (101) – that all of American literature comes from one great book, Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn – indicates this author's towering place in American (102) tradition. Early 19th-century American writers (103) to be too flowery, sentimental, or ostentatious – partially because they were still trying to prove that they (104) write as elegantly as the English. Based on vigorous, realistic, colloquial American speech, Twain's style gave American (105) a new appreciation of their national voice. Twain was the (106) major American author to come from the interior of the country, (107) he captured its distinctive slang, humor, and character. (108) Twain and other American writers of the late 19th century, realism was (109) just a literary technique, but rather a way of speaking truth and exploding worn-out conventions. As such, it was profoundly liberating, though potentially at (110) with society.

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101.

a. reputation b. novel

c. statement d. philosophy

102.

a. literary b. literal

c. literate d. literacy

103.

a. hated b. tended

c. inclined d. had

104.

a. not b. and

c. to d. could

105.

a. writers b. public

c. novels d. critics

106.

a. most b. first

c. other d. next

107.

a. as b. however

c. and d. which

108.

a. For b. Despite

c. If d. Since

109.

a. only b. not

c. always d. plainly

110.

a. conflict b. risk

c. fault d. odds

PRACTICE TEST 2 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 3 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about how elephants communicate with each other.

It’s a safari postcard moment: a family of elephants rush together, rumbling, trumpeting, and screaming, their chorused voices deafening in the wilderness. To casual observers, the sight is pure animal theatrics, but biologist Joyce Poole knows there’s a lot more happening than meets the ear. She and others have found that the elephants not only trumpet their calls (91) also squeal, cry, scream, roar, snort, rumble, and groan. And some of the sounds are so low-pitched that they aren’t even (92) to human ears. (93) of Scientists say elephants have an elaborate communication because they need it to maintain a complex social structure based on strong family relationships. One of the (94) identified so (95) is what Poole describes as the “let’s go” rumble, which is used to suggest “I want to go in this direction – let’s go together.” A drawn-out rumbling, it lasts about five to six seconds and is usually repeated every 80 seconds or so (96) the caller gets results. (97)

91.

a. and b. can

c. but d. they

92.

a. dispensable b. audible

c. sensible d. eligible

93.

a. system b. way

c. network d. technology

94.

a. elephants b. relationships

c. structures d. calls

95.

a. long b. much

c. far d. that

96.

a. until b. because

c. that d. provided

97.

a. This b. There

c. Another d. Rumbling

98.

a. does b. emits

c. exhales d. has

99.

a. elephant b. enemy

c. instant d. answer

a. touch b. danger

c. love d. motion

100.

is the “contact call.” An elephant calling for a distant family member (98) a powerful reverberating sound and then lifts its head and spreads its ears while listening for an (99) . If it receives one, it responds with an explosive sound, signifying “We’re in (100) .” Items that ask you to cho ose bet ween four nouns with totally dif ferent meanings (e.g., items 94 and 99) are often discourse question s that test your ability to follow the wr iter’s train of thought. You’ll have a bet ter chance of answering correctly if you widen your focus and consider sev eral sentences before and after each bla nk. Item 100 is a variation on this. Note thee word “in” before the bla nk. All four nouns collocate with “in,” but only one suits the writer’s train of tho ught. To answer, go back several senten ces and consider each phrase in contex t.

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PRACTICE TEST 3 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 3 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about sleep apnea.

At least half of all chronic snorers suffer from the disorder known as obstructive sleep apnea, in which breathing actually stops for as (101) as 90 seconds, often hundreds of times a night. Each time the oxygen level drops, the snorer begins to waken (102) , with a loud snort, gasps for air. (103) the heart must work harder during these episodes, sleep apnea (104) the entire cardiovascular system and may eventually (105) high blood pressure and enlargement of the heart. It may also (106) the risk of stroke. Apnea sufferers are (107) chronically sleep deprived. (108) their bodies must struggle constantly to keep the throat muscles tense enough to (109) open airways, they (110) slip into the deep sleep needed to wake up feeling rested.

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101.

a. far b. long

c. soon d. little

102.

a. up b. and

c. but d. so

103.

a. Since b. However

c. Then d. Although

104.

a. awakens b. destroys

c. strains d. strengthens

105.

a. lead b. cause

c. raise d. suffer

106.

a. endanger b. diminish

c. increase d. promote

107.

a. also b. not

c. among d. more

108.

a. Although b. Unless

c. With d. Because

109.

a. restrict b. close

c. maintain d. block

110.

a. rarely b. should

c. gradually d. can

PRACTICE TEST 3 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 4 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about hybrid animals.

When it comes to mating, species don’t always stick to their own kind. Take Kekaimalu the “wholphin,” as she’s known, the hybrid (91) of a false killer whale and a bottlenose dolphin, who lives at Sea Life Park in Hawaii. Then (92) the “liger,” a hybrid of a female tiger and male lion ( (93) called a “tigon,” if the mother is the lion). Ligers and tigons have manes like a lion, the sleek bodies and (94) of a tiger, and the 900-pound heft of a lion. But the list doesn’t stop there. To create work animals with (95) greater strength and agility, people have mules (sterile combinations of horses and donkeys) and zorses (a cross between a zebra and a horse). And not long ago, Russians (96) with breeding combinations of jackals and husky dogs to form a hybrid with elite bomb-sniffing abilities. (98) (97) ? Some that Are hybrids like these interspecies mating has long played a role in evolution. Others maintain (99) hybrids are the result of unhealthy human interference and, if unleashed in the wild, can (100)

91.

a. mate b. offspring

c. sibling d. ancestor

92.

a. is b. there’s

c. comes d. goes

93.

a. successively b. subsequently

c. alternatively d. unfortunately

94.

a. stripes b. spots

c. bands d. streaks

95.

a. ridden b. grown

c. bred d. saddled

96.

a. associated b. considered

c. collaborated d. experimented

97.

a. natural b. physical

c. physiological d. legal

98.

a. quarrel b. recommend

c. decide d. argue

99.

a. whether b. that

c. although d. because

100.

a. improve b. conserve

c. threaten d. ignore

the integrity of existing species. Whether or not this is true, hybrids continue to appear, both in controlled settings, such as zoos and farms, and in the wild. Before choosing an ans wer, make sure that: (a) it makes sense with the tex t that comes several sentences before and after the blank, and (b) it fits in with the gra mmar of the surrounding tex t (e.g., sub ject-verb rb agreement, pronouns, dep endentt prepositions).

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PRACTICE TEST 4 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 4 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about the relationship between being a parent and happiness.

Why do people keep having kids? Conventional wisdom dictates that people become parents because children bring joy. But do they really? A recent study that (101) into the relationship between parenting and happiness levels in adult identical twins – some of whom are parents and some who aren’t – may be getting to the (102) of the issue. The study found that people with children are, in fact, happier than those without children, but that a second or third child doesn’t add to parental happiness at (103) . In fact, additional children seem to make mothers (104) happy than mothers with (105) one child – though still happier than women with (106) children. “If you want to maximize your subjective well-being,” says the lead researcher, “you probably (107) stop at one child. (108) seems to happen over time is that you look forward to (109) another child. Then you have it and find it really difficult, and your happiness dips.” Overall, the lesson seems to be that just having (110) at least once might be the crucial aspect that provides the happiness gain.

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101.

a. looked b. came

c. explored d. researched

102.

a. subject b. top

c. point d. bottom

103.

a. random b. most

c. all d. last

104.

a. less b. so

c. are d. not

105.

a. the b. over

c. only d. barely

106.

a. two b. no

c. additional d. any

107.

a. should b. don’t

c. may d. must

108.

a. It b. Much

c. What d. Something

109.

a. bringing b. having

c. making d. doing

110.

a. married b. parents

c. reproduced d. born

PRACTICE TEST 4 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 5 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about babies and sign language.

Teaching an infant sign language may sound like an odd thing to do, but research has shown that it makes good sense. Babies have the cognitive capacity to understand language (91) they can speak, and early on, they have (92) control of their hands than their (93) . If babies can learn

91.

a. so b. before

c. and d. because

92.

a. worse b. no

c. some d. better

93.

signs for objects and concepts (milk, for example, or dirty), then they can (94) their needs rather than simply crying.

a. legs b. mouths

c. fingers d. parents

94.

a. increase b. verbalize

c. communicate d. interpret

95.

a. Growing b. Checking

c. Following d. Giving

96.

a. though b. because

c. providing d. that

97.

a. deny b. doubt

c. worry d. hope

98.

a. actually b. have

c. be d. not

99.

a. that b. had

c. they d. were

100.

a. of b. have

c. and d. whose

Linda Acredolo, psychologist and co-author of Baby Sign: How to Talk to Your Baby Before Your Baby Can Talk, first investigated sign language with her infant daughter in 1985. (95) up on her initial experiment with years of lab research, she found that most children can learn to sign at around one, (96) a lot depends on a child’s individual development. It usually takes several months of parental signing before a child will respond. (97) Parents often that signing will slow verbal development, but Acredolo’s research shows that early signing may (98) promote language learning. In one study of 140 pairs of parents, couples (99) randomly asked to use hand signals or to provide plenty of verbal stimulation. The babies (100) parents signed to them later scored higher on repeated tests of verbal ability. And at age 8, the children who had signed scored an average of 12 points higher on an intelligence (IQ) test.

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STRUCTURE/MEANIN

G ALERT! Before choosing a com parative word like “worse” or “better” (see item 92), make sure that the sen tence where the blank occurs requires a comparison. The presence of the wo rd “than” in the sentence is usually a goo d indicator that a comparative is needed , but which of thee two should you choose ? To be safe, you need to go back to the beginning of the paragraph and follow the writer’s train of thought to make sure your answer is logical and in line with the meaning of what comes before and after.

PRACTICE TEST 5 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 5 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about a clever teenage inventor.

Kavita Shukla may be just 16, but she’s been inventing stuff for years. In fourth grade, she came up with an egg slicer (decorated with a plastic chicken) that was activated by a marble. At 13, after her mother had lost three gas caps from her car, Kavita rigged up a temperature-sensitive system that (101) when the cap was off. But her best invention so far – for (102) she recently won a Lemelson-MIT High School Invention Apprenticeship – was (103) while visiting her grandmother in Bhopal, India, where tap water teems with bacteria. One day, after Kavita (104) some water while brushing her teeth, her grandmother gave her fenugreek – an herb used in Indian cooking and medicine. Kavita didn’t get sick, and she began to (105) whether the herb could really protect (106) bacteria. Soon her family’s refrigerator was full of berries, some rotting, others remaining remarkably (107) . Now after two years of experimenting, Kavita has shown that paper treated with fenugreek does (108) preserve fruits and vegetables for weeks.

101.

a. cooled b. gestured

c. signaled d. stopped

102.

a. whom b. that

c. when d. which

103.

a. inspired b. dreamed

c. built d. founded

104.

a. boiled b. swallowed

c. spilled d. ran

105.

a. doubt b. understand

c. wonder d. deny

106.

a. against b. of

c. people d. harmful

107.

a. cool b. fresh

c. moldy d. organic

108.

a. indeed b. not

c. therefore d. hence

109.

a. restorative b. healing

c. destructive d. preservative

110.

a. give b. let

c. allow d. make

No one knows the why or how of fenugreek’s (109) properties, but the apprenticeship should help her find out. It will (110) her to continue her research in a well-equipped lab under the guidance of a leading scientist.

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PRACTICE TEST 5 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 6 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about the dangers that tall buildings pose to birds.

Many tall office buildings leave their lights on at night, a wasteful practice that has lethal consequences for migrating birds. Confused by the lit windows, millions of birds slam into tall buildings and die every year, says a conservation ecologist at the Chicago Field Museum. He and his colleagues quantified the losses by (91) the number of birds that hit McCormick Place, a 90-foot-tall glass convention center in Chicago. Over the last two years, 1,297 birds – mostly sparrows, warblers, and thrushes – perished after flying into (92) windows. During the same period, only 192 died from hitting dark windows, (93) the windows were unlit nearly half the time during the study. The (94) place an additional strain on (95) species such as wood thrushes. “This is just another pressure that the birds don’t need,” says the ecologist. (96) most window collisions occur during the peak migratory times after midnight, he (97) that skyscrapers turn (98) their lights from 11 p.m. (99) dawn during the two migration seasons, from late March through May and from mid-August to Thanksgiving. A seasonal lights-out campaign would also (100) the buildings’ electricity bills.

91.

a. identifying b. burying

c. tagging d. counting

92.

a. illustrative b. illuminated

c. illustrated d. illustrious

93.

a. because b. although

c. while d. whenever

94.

a. windows b. facts

c. deaths d. birds

95.

a. declining b. extinct

c. deadly d. threatening

96.

a. Since b. After

c. While d. Unless

97.

a. admits b. implies

c. suggests d. regrets

98.

a. up b. over

c. in d. out

99.

a. and b. at

c. every d. until

a. subtract b. reduce

c. deduct d. downgrade

100.

Linking words (e.g., bec ause, while, although, and, but) are often remove d to test your ability to understand the writer ’s overall meaning. g. Items 93 and 96 are goo d examples. Beforree you answer, it’s import ant to examine the contex t several sen tences before and after the blank to see how the tex t flows from one sentence to the nex t and one clause to the nex t.

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PRACTICE TEST 6 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 6 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about an interesting discovery made by a paleobiologist.

Bugs have been eating plants for over 300 million years. But insects that actually reside within the plants they feed on are generally assumed to have emerged about 120 million years ago. A paleobiologist has found (101) of an insect larva1 that apparently (102) within fern fronds in the swamp forests of Illinois some 300 million years ago. Modern insects like the sawfly deposit their eggs inside a plant’s leaf or stem (103) that the larvae will have plant cells to feed on when they hatch. (104) the larvae begin to feed, the plant responds to injury by surrounding its wounds with protective cells that also (105) to be highly nutritious. The insects thus trick their host into (106) them with a choice meal.

101.

a. signals b. signs

c. tracks d. symptoms

102.

a. lived b. flew

c. inhabited d. discovered

103.

a. and b. proving

c. hoping d. so

104.

a. As b. Before

c. Knowing d. Perhaps

105.

a. have b. occur

c. happen d. claim

106.

a. deceiving b. providing

c. making d. giving

107.

a. of b. for

c. were d. while

Researchers recognized the hallmarks of a similar strategy (107) studying slices of the 300-million-year-old fossilized fern fronds. Some of the ferns bore scars left by grubs 2 of some kind (108) had tunneled through the fronds. The grubs had chewed their way out before the ferns fossilized, (109) they left behind waste matter, which was (110) to contain

108.

a. they b. that

c. and d. after

109.

a. because b. that

c. but d. so

110.

a. found b. supposed

c. analyzed d. used

resin-filled cells identical to surrounding plant cells. 1

larva: a young insect that emerges from its egg in the form of a short, fat worm that gradually metamorphoses into an adult. The plural is larvae.

2

grub: same as larva (see previous note).

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PRACTICE TEST 6 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 7 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about John James Audubon, the famous American wildlife artist.

For over half a century, John James Audubon (1785–1851) was America’s foremost wildlife artist. Today his name remains synonymous with birds and bird conservation the world over. Not many of the birds Audubon drew stood still for him, nor (91) cameras or binoculars yet been invented. To study and draw birds, (92) was necessary to shoot them. Audubon’s predecessors typically skinned their specimens, preserved the skins with arsenic, stuffed them with frayed rope, and (93) set them up on branches in order to draw them. But the (94) drawings looked as stiff and as dead as their subjects. Audubon dreamed of (95) his subjects, and while still a young man, (96) found a way to mount freshly killed specimens on sharpened wires set into a gridded board (97) allowed him to place them in lifelike positions. He (98) them first, and then filled in his drawings (99) watercolor that he rubbed with a cork to imitate the metallic cast of their feathers. The results were (100) less than magnificent.

91.

a. had b. the

c. when d. were

92.

a. and b. there

c. which d. it

93.

a. even b. then

c. he d. would

94.

a. conclusive b. preceding

c. successive d. resulting

95.

a. reviving b. rejuvenating

c. revitalizing d. reliving

96.

a. would b. he

c. was d. having

97.

a. but b. it

c. that d. while

98.

a. cleaned b. painted

c. photographed d. sketched

99.

a. with b. and

c. the d. his

a. much b. even

c. nothing d. not

100.

When you come across a sentence with severa l blanks, it’s helpful to ana lyze the structure of the sentence before tac kling each blank. Ask yourself questions like: • How many clauses doe s the sentence have? • What is the subject and verb of each clause? • What element is mis sing in each blank? When you have filled in the sentence, reread it and check to see that you r choices suit both thee grammar and meaning of the entire sentence as well as the grammar and meaning of the surrounding tex t.

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PRACTICE TEST 7 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 7 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about wolverines.

The wolverine is the largest North American member of the weasel (or Mustelidae) family. Although big males rarely (101) 40 pounds, the animals are (102) with vocal cords like those of a grizzly bear, providing them with a handy defensive mechanism that (103) off larger predators. Wolverines are primarily opportunistic scavengers, particularly during the colder months (104) they (105) on mostly winter-killed carrion. In (106) to wolves and other pack animals, (107) follow big-game herds to winter ranges for a dependable food supply, wolverines are more solitary creatures that can travel dozens of miles in a matter of days, up and over peaks and ridge tops in (108) of food. The physical makeup of wolverines – particularly their strong jaws and large incisor teeth – enhance their (109) to chew on bones. In fact, their viselike* jaw muscles sometimes (110) them to chew their way through traps or cages. * viselike: like a vise (a metal tool with two jaw-like pieces that are

101.

a. weighing b. exceed

c. gain d. over

102.

a. constructed b. possessed

c. adorned d. equipped

103.

a. carries b. takes

c. scares d. calls

104.

a. unless b. when

c. until d. although

105.

a. hunt b. look

c. feed d. hunger

106.

a. relation b. regard

c. contrast d. order

107.

a. which b. that

c. they d. and

108.

a. view b. order

c. search d. case

109.

a. ability b. need

c. instinct d. desire

110.

a. prevent b. strengthen

c. enable d. cause

designed to hold an object firmly in place while work is being done on it). Note: In British English, the tool is called a vice.

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PRACTICE TEST 7 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 8 Cloze Passage 1 This passage is about the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Alexandria, Egypt.

After two decades of planning and construction, the Bibliotheca Alexandrina now stands on Alexandria’s waterfront, just 130 feet from the sea. Opened to the (91) on April 23rd, 2002, the library was designed as a tilting disk (92) from the ground. (93) seven levels above ground and four below, the scale of the building is thus minimized at close quarters, (94) it does not overwhelm the visitor. (95) to be an architectural signature like Australia’s Sydney Opera House and Spain’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, the library is (96) worldwide attention, not only for its bold architecture (97) for its (98) to the site of the most famous library of the ancient world. But can Egypt, a poor country by any standard, (99) a library (100) of the one that housed the wisdom of ancient Greece? “Creativity and culture are sound bases for development,” responded the library’s former project manager. “We make our buildings,” he said, quoting Churchill, “and after, our buildings make us.”

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a. public b. society

c. audience d. population

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a. reaching b. rising

c. leaping d. increasing

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a. Elevated b. Its

c. All d. With

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a. so b. because

c. when d. unless

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a. Seeming b. Intended

c. Designing d. Going

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a. become b. having

c. attracted d. drawing

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a. but b. even

c. just d. and

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a. association b. location

c. proximity d. similarity

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a. build b. attend

c. achieve d. maintain

a. proud b. capable

c. worthy d. aware

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“Clozing” remarks Remember that the clo ck is ticking. Don’t spend too much tim e on any one question. If you’re not sure of the answer, guess and move on. You should plan on spe nding about 10 minutes total on the two passsa sag ges es in this section. Any more, and you’re robbing yourself of time that you u could put to bet ter use on the fou ourr reading passages.

© 2013 Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for classroom use.

PRACTICE TEST 8 Cloze - Passage 1

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Practice Test 8 Cloze Passage 2 This passage is about the worldwide rise of a deadly disease.

In the United States, an encounter with summer’s most annoying pest – the mosquito – is trouble enough, but in many parts of the world, it can be deadly. Malaria (101) 300 to 500 million people every year and kills nearly 3 million, (102) 1 million children. A single mosquito bite can (103) the disease, which causes fever, chills, nausea and, in some (104) , death. This disease, which was eradicated in the United States during the 1950s, is one of the world’s biggest (105) of children. The greatest problem impeding the struggle against malaria is the rise of resistance to the drugs that treat the disease. In many parts of the world, the drugs (106) commonly used to treat malaria no (107) work, and doctors are (108) to more expensive alternatives – and in some countries (109) these are failing to work. As a result, countries that had previously seen a (110) in malaria cases are now seeing a resurgence.

© 2013 Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for classroom use.

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a. contacts b. injures

c. infects d. influences

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a. particularly b. including

c. about d. even

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a. spread b. emit

c. give d. catch

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a. times b. occasions

c. instants d. cases

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a. threats b. killers

c. victims d. fears

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a. were b. which

c. most d. it

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a. longer b. sooner

c. more d. further

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a. using b. turning

c. experimenting d. going

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a. which b. where

c. only d. even

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a. rise b. decline

c. tendency d. cure

PRACTICE TEST 8 Cloze - Passage 2

Michigan Proficiency Final Countdown Practice Tests

Key to Revised Cloze Passages Practice Test 1

Practice Test 2

Practice Test 3

Practice Test 4

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Practice Test 5

Practice Test 6

Practice Test 7

Practice Test 8

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© 2013 Cengage Learning. Permission granted to photocopy for classroom use.

Key to Revised Cloze Passages

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